forsythiahill:

My reseeding Marigold Patch. Every year I look forward to this maintenance free zone beside our shed. I collected this seed from a friend’s yard and it reliably comes back year after year on Forsythia Hill in Charlottesville, Virginia.



rosamutabilis:

Iceland poppies

rosamutabilis:

Iceland poppies




timothea:

A few photos of xanthoria aureola taken in the summer of 2013, in Doolin, Ireland. 




natures-bounty:

Various other fungi - August 2014

Photos are mine.




Goldenrod :D



Slug love among the fungi. (Sorry for the poor quality it was dark in the woods)

Slug love among the fungi. (Sorry for the poor quality it was dark in the woods)




Berries at the marsh. Silky dogwood, grey dogwood and autumn olive I believe but i might be wrong about the first one.




Lilypad love at crosswinds marsh



Purple loosestrife

Purple loosestrife



steepravine:

Mistletoe Berries
I’m still not sure how these things get started up in the middle of trees!
(Desolation Wilderness, California - 8/2014)

steepravine:

Mistletoe Berries

I’m still not sure how these things get started up in the middle of trees!

(Desolation Wilderness, California - 8/2014)



stonybrookwoods:

Goldenrod

stonybrookwoods:

Goldenrod



biodiverseed:


Fasciated daisy — Fasciated stems are produced due to abnormal activity in the growing tip of the plant.  Often an abnormal number of flowers are produced on affected stems. Normal branches may arise from fasciated stems. Fasciation is unpredictable and is usually limited to a single stem. It seldom recurs the following year.

Another fun fact: daisy leaves are edible.
#garden science #flowers #edible flowers #eat the weeds

biodiverseed:

Fasciated daisy — Fasciated stems are produced due to abnormal activity in the growing tip of the plant.  Often an abnormal number of flowers are produced on affected stems. Normal branches may arise from fasciated stems. Fasciation is unpredictable and is usually limited to a single stem. It seldom recurs the following year.

Another fun fact: daisy leaves are edible.

#garden science #flowers #edible flowers #eat the weeds

(Source: malformalady)



rhamphotheca:

The Brazilian Jabuticaba tree (Plinia cauliflora) well and truly takes advantage of all the surface area on its trunk by growing its sweet, grape-like fruits all over.
* This syndrome of growing fruit on the trunk is called cauliflory, and is believed to have evolved to make fruit more accessible to gound based frugivorous animals. The fruits are a popular food for humans in parts of South America, and have a wide variety of preparations and uses. (- Paxon)
Images: Bruno.karklis and Anderson S Silva (bit.ly/1sXHwip)
(via: ScienceAlert!)

rhamphotheca:

The Brazilian Jabuticaba tree (Plinia cauliflora) well and truly takes advantage of all the surface area on its trunk by growing its sweet, grape-like fruits all over.

* This syndrome of growing fruit on the trunk is called cauliflory, and is believed to have evolved to make fruit more accessible to gound based frugivorous animals. The fruits are a popular food for humans in parts of South America, and have a wide variety of preparations and uses. (- Paxon)

Images: Bruno.karklis and Anderson S Silva (bit.ly/1sXHwip)

(via: ScienceAlert!)



rhamphotheca:

Science and Conservation Groups Seek Endangered Status for the Monarch Butterfly
This morning (8/27/14), the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation joined the Center for Biological Diversity and Center for Food Safety (co-lead petitioners) and renowned monarch scientist Dr. Lincoln Brower to file a legal request with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service seeking Endangered Species Act protection for the monarch butterfly.  The number of monarchs has declined by more than 90 percent in less than two decades. The population has declined from a recorded high of approximately 1 billion butterflies in the mid-1990s to only 35 million butterflies last winter, the lowest number ever recorded, a drop that Lincoln Brower describes as “a deadly free fall.”  During the same period it is estimated that these butterflies have lost more than 165 million acres of habitat—an area about the size of Texas—including nearly a third of their summer breeding grounds…
(read more: The Xerces Society)

rhamphotheca:

Science and Conservation Groups Seek Endangered Status for the Monarch Butterfly

This morning (8/27/14), the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation joined the Center for Biological Diversity and Center for Food Safety (co-lead petitioners) and renowned monarch scientist Dr. Lincoln Brower to file a legal request with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service seeking Endangered Species Act protection for the monarch butterfly.

The number of monarchs has declined by more than 90 percent in less than two decades. The population has declined from a recorded high of approximately 1 billion butterflies in the mid-1990s to only 35 million butterflies last winter, the lowest number ever recorded, a drop that Lincoln Brower describes as “a deadly free fall.”

During the same period it is estimated that these butterflies have lost more than 165 million acres of habitat—an area about the size of Texas—including nearly a third of their summer breeding grounds…

(read more: The Xerces Society)



dendroica:

Biennial Beeblossom, Gaura biennis (by Dendroica cerulea)

dendroica:

Biennial Beeblossom, Gaura biennis (by Dendroica cerulea)